Last year was a challenging one for the natural products industry, with pressures already evident in 2014. The Natural Products Association’s (NPA) new president, Roxanne Green, of Seattle-based PCC Natural Markets, believes that events this year may have far-reaching effects that impact the future of the natural products industry:

nancy trent

I made a few predictions about emerging food trends before the annual Winter Fancy Food show, held in San Francisco January 19–21.

Hadley, MA—A small-animal study has found that stress-induced damage to the gastrointestinal tract may be helped with a vitamin E tocotrienols.

New Brunswick, NJ—New data published in Phytomedicine suggest that a vitamin C-packed superfruit may help support healthy blood circulation in the body.

Ham Lake, MN—Bioenergy Life Science, based here, recently made public the results of a small-animal study in which the effects of caffeine and/or their branded ribose ingredient (Bioenergy) were tested on fatigued subjects.

Hoboken, NJ—A two-part study published in The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness has generated some interesting results for anyone concerned about reducing muscle soreness after exercise.

chocolate berry health

London, England—Eating more foods with high levels of flavonoids could reduce the risk of diabetes, according to a study published in the Journal of Nutrition.

social media tips

Washington, D.C.—Supplement manufacturers know their advertising efforts and product labeling are closing monitored by regulators, but they should be just as stringent with how they handle their social media outreach. Such was the message in the Natural Products Association (NPA)’s first installment of its 2014 Wednesday Webinar Series on January 22, entitled, “Social Media for Dietary Supplements: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly.”

3-D printing, wearable technologies and robots are all making headlines for their Jetsons-quality lifestyle implications.