niacin cholesterol

Allendale, NJ—The tell-tale red flush that accompanies the consumption of niacin supplements has made many shoppers opt for the flush-free variety. According to new data, consumers may want to think twice about this choice.

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Berlin, Germany—A branded larch arabinogalactan (ResistAid, from Lonza, Inc., with U.S. headquarters in Allendale, NJ) may prevent colds thanks to its “immune-stimulatory properties.” Such were the findings in a study published by German researchers in Current Medical Research and Opinion.

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News and notes from industry suppliers.

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arthritis chondroitin

Los Angeles, CA—Researchers from the Palm Beach Research Center in Florida have compiled compelling data on the effects of a proprietary squid-derived chondroitin E ingredient (IncaCartilago from OptiPure/Kenko International, based here) on bone health.

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A complaint filed with the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) has the potential to turn the krill industry on its head. Neptune Technologies & Bioressources, based in Laval, QC, Canada, believes several of its competitors in the krill oil category are infringing on at least one claim from its U.S. patent (#8,278,351), and the company wants it to stop.

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News and notes from industry suppliers.

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News and notes from industry suppliers.

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Brighton, UK—When you look at a drink, does the texture or creaminess influence how full it will make you? Some people believe yes. Keri McCrickerd, researcher at the University of Sussex, says, “Hunger and fullness are complicated issues because it is not just the calories in a food or drink that make it filling. Signals from the stomach are important but so too is how the drink feels in the mouth.” Published in Biomed Central’s journal, Flavour, McCrickerd and colleagues tested whether the texture and creaminess of a yogurt drink affects our perceptions on fullness and satiety.

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Migdal HaEmeq, Israel—Calcified Tissue International just published a study from Meir Medical Center in Israel (sponsored by Enzymotec, with global headquarters, here) that indicates a branded ingredient may support bone strength in infants.

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Allendale, NJ—Researchers from Kurfürstendamm and Analyze & Realize ag in Germany published a new study in Food and Nutrition Sciences showing that a branded prebiotic fiber is safe and well tolerated.

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