How do you create an effective end cap? Here are a few tips.

1. An end cap is promotional, so you should refresh it at least once per month.
2. Pick your theme first, like “Heart Health Month” for February.
3. Use a visual design concept based on the theme, such as pink hearts, to increase “wow” factor.
4. Less is more. Select fewer products, and stock them deeper than usual.

The organic food industry should be on alert for five fraudulent organic certificates circulating in the market, according to the USDA’s National Organic Program (NOP). The certificates falsely represent a slew of products from producers in various countries, including blueberries, cranberries and other berries from Russia; green coffee, green tea and hot chocolate from China; bell peppers and tomatoes from the Dominican Republic; several products including honey, teas, seeds and spices from Kuwait; and various other vegetables from another Chinese company.

Orlando, FLVitamin C is necessary for everyone, although one study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011 suggests daily intake is even more important for those with existing heart conditions.

Fukuoka, Japan—Researchers from Japan’s Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences at Kyushu University and Daiichi Sangyo Co., Ltd., have discovered a possible anti-cancer agent in brown seaweed.

Washington, D.C.—The 15th Annual Natural Products Day (hosted by the Natural Products Association [NPA]) is slated to be held on Tuesday, March 27.

Arlington Heights, IL—Carlson Laboratories is offering free red aprons to retailers to help raise awareness about women’s heart health.

University Park, PA—The fruit of an avocado may be green, but its seed may be helpful as a totally different natural coloring agent.

Carthage, MO—Much research points to the benefits of natural eggshell membrane (NEM from ESM Technologies) for joint health. Now, the Journal of Medicinal Food has published the results of an in vitro study on a mechanism of action for why.

Norway—Those living with ulcerative colitis (i.e., inflammation and sores in the gastrointestinal tract) often have no other choice but to take “hard-core” medications to control their condition like steroids, immunosuppressants and even chemotherapeutics. Many would love a more natural way to control the inflammation. A small animal study conducted by researchers from the University of Bergen, Norway, may offer a new prospect for this purpose.