An iron supplement that won’t upset your stomach or cause constipation.

A Healthquest Podcast by Steve Lankford

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iron supplementsMany women struggle with iron deficiency anemia. The most common challenge is the iron supplements that are commonly recommended (ferrous sulfate) as a solution is not well tolerate. It is not easily absorbed. It commonly causes nausea, upset stomach and constipation. These effects are not only unpleasant, but also make it difficult to be compliant with the treatment. There is a better way.

iron supplementsMany years ago, I discovered Blood Builder by MegaFood. This is an amazing supplement. It is the perfect supplement for women struggling with iron deficiency anemia. First of all it works, seemingly much better than ferrous sulfate or ferrous fumerate. Women feel much erin stokesbetter when taking Blood Builder. It does not upset the stomach or cause constipation. It includes the other nutrients required for iron absorption. And like all MegaFood supplements it contains food-state nutrients AND real food including organic oranges and beet root.

In this interview, Dr. Erin Stokes discusses MegaFood Blood Builder as a supplement and how she has used it in her personal life and clinical practice.

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Steve Lankford talks to Brenda Watson about omega-3 oils and digestive health.

Steve Lankford is the host of HealthQuestPodcast.com. Steve has over 40 years of experience in the natural products industry. His passion is helping others develop nutritional programs that work. At HealthQuestPodcast.com, Steve interviews the experts in the fields of science and nutrition. His in depth explorations and consumer friendly style are designed help listeners learn about the science of nutrition. His guests are some of the most respected experts in the natural products industry.

To learn more, visit HealthQuestPodcast.com.

NOTE: The statements presented in this podcast should not be considered medical advice or a way to diagnose or treat any disease or illness. Dietary supplements do not treat, cure or prevent any disease. Always seek the advice of a medical professional before adding a dietary supplement to (or removing one from) your daily regimen. WholeFoods Magazine does not endorse any specific brand or product.

Published by WholeFoods Magazine Online, 3/2/15