Non-GMO Update

On July 23rd, the House of Representatives voted to pass the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act of 2015 (H.R. 1599), advancing it along to the Senate with lightning speed.

ancient harvestAncient Harvest now offers Cheddar Lentil & Quinoa Supergrain Mac & Cheese, which include gluten-free and plant-based sources of protein, according to the company. Varieties include Mild, Sharp and White Cheddar. Each serving is said to offer 16 g of protein and 7 g of fiber per serving.

arctic zeroChunky Pints by Arctic Zero are said to offer taste without the extra fat or calories of other desserts. Each serving of this lactose-free frozen dessert contains whey protein and has 75 calories. Flavors include: Cookie Dough Chip, Cool Mint Chip, A Lil’ Bit Chippy, Buttery Pecan and Key Lime Pie.

TH Foods, Inc. launched Harvest Stone, an organic line of crunchy snack mixes that the company says offers less fat than traditional potato chips. These gluten-free mixes come in three varieties: Original, Bold and Cheese. Some of the healthy ingredients used throughout the line include amaranth, quinoa and flax seed.

From Spice Pharm comes Golden Goddess Turmeric Chai Elixir, a turmeric health tonic. This instant drink supports brain, adrenal and heart health, as well as mood and energy support, according to the company. Golden Goddess is vegan, non-GMO and gluten free. It is made with organic spices and herbs including turmeric, Ceylon cinnamon, ginger, cardamom and clove. The company says the drink has a creamy texture, and also comes in Chocolate flavor.

News from industry food companies.

Stamford, CT—A new survey from Daymon Worldwide suggests that 50% of consumers are more concerned about food safety than they were five years ago, and these fears are playing out in some of their buying decisions when they go to the shelf.

Beijing, China—A new long-term observational study published in BMJ suggests that regular consumption of spicy foods may play a role in lowering the risk of early death from various causes.

When we see the words gluten-free, allergen-free or dairy-free on the shelf, in many cases, our mind goes to the preventative—the idea that these foods are here to accommodate for health needs. On paper, this may still be the case, but in reality, that frame of mind is outdated, and we need only to look to the numbers to prove it.