News from industry food companies.

The gluten-free labeling rule issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in August of 2013 went into effect on August 5, 2014. It requires any food product that carries a gluten-free claim to contain no more than 20 parts per million of gluten. Labeling of gluten as an ingredient in food products remains voluntary.

Seapoint Farms offers Dry Roasted Premium Black Edamame with Sea Salt. Black edamame is packed with antioxidants and proteins. The edamame is packaged in 3.5-oz. bags for easy transport and convenient eating, and is gluten-free and non-GMO.
SRP: $1.99

Wonderfully Raw has released new Coco-Roons snacks. Brussel Bytes are made from coconut, organic Brussels sprouts and chili seeds and are available in Chili Pumpkin Seed Crunch and Tamarind Apple Crunch. Snip Chips are made from organic parsnips and coconut, and have fiber, omega-3 and potassium. Snip Chips flavors include Cheesy Herb Truffle and Chipotle Lime Cilantro.

Premium Gold Flax introduced Debbie Kay’s Kitchen gluten-free baking mixes. Each mix is made with proprietary true cold milled (TCM) golden omega flax and ancient grains. The formulas are based on the company’s gluten-free all-purpose flour. Options include Double Chocolate Chip Brownie Mix, Pancake and Waffle Mix, Muffin Mix and more.

Mary’s Gone Crackers’s line of organic crackers now has new Graham Crackers in Classic or Chocolate flavors. USDA Certified Organic, non-GMO, soy- and gluten-free and completely vegan, these Graham Crackers are made with a special blend of tapioca, coconut, rice and other flours, as well as organic chia seeds and quinoa flakes.

Washington, D.C.—Food companies that aren’t certified organic and that have a form of the word “organic” in their name may be scrutinized more closely, following a rule clarification by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The agency released a notice limiting the ways such companies can display the word “organic” on packages, and instructing organic certifiers to enforce the policy.

Denver, CO—Another GMO labeling ballot initiative will be put to a popular vote, thanks to a successful signature campaign in Colorado. Supporters of Proposition 105 to label genetically modified foods gathered almost 125,000 valid signatures, almost 40,000 more than required, and submitted them to the Colorado Secretary of State. Voters will now decide whether they want a GMO labeling law on this year’s Election Day, November 4.