Turmeric is a widely known kitchen staple that is used in foods ranging from curry to ballpark mustard. Turmeric is derived from the rhizomes, or underground stems, of the Curcuma longa plant. Found within turmeric are powerful curcuminoids, which are fat-soluble polyphenolic pigments that give this spice its vibrant yellow color. Curcumin is the most prevalent curcuminoid found in turmeric, and has recently gained popularity in supplement form for its health benefits that stem from it acting as an antioxidant and fighting inflammation (1).

Despite thousands of supportive studies spanning more than 40 years showing dietary omega-3 fats EPA and DHA protect against heart disease, the recent publication of a study on the effectiveness of fish oil in heart patients has confused many. One confounding factor was that most of the media sensationalized the story with totally incorrect headlines.

 

 

 We left off in Part One with this: “The facilitated session ended, as had all of the others, with no consensus on ractopamine. But, as it turned out, finding consensus on ractopamine at this meeting had never been in the game plan for the pro-ractopamine forces.”

I thought I was prepared. Like most New Jerseyans, my husband and I had been following news of Hurricane Sandy and did everything we could to meet her head on. The patio furniture was secured, an über-load of clothing was laundered, the bare essentials were stockpiled, ice packs were in the freezer, and food that could be eaten cold was prepared.

Confidence and health are vital for men and women inside and outside of the bedroom. When sexual desire, performance and health decline over time, we blame age as hormone levels and functionality change. However, the way you feel about yourself doesn’t have to change, too. Many natural remedies can help the body cope with physical and emotional changes to benefit libido and sexual well-being.

We frequently receive requests for an update column on women’s health problems. This month, we will chat with Helen Saul Case, the author of The Vitamin Cure for Women’s Health Problems.

Would you like an extra $30,000 to promote your store every year? There’s a rather large and open secret in the natural products industry: independent retailers are consistently losing out on their share of cooperative advertising dollars that manufacturers have allocated to spend on them. But, if manufacturers are ready to fork over these dollars to you, what do they do with them if they aren’t writing you a check? Let’s take a closer look.

Dear Editor,
I reviewed WholeFoods Magazine’s recent article, “Tocotrienols: Emerging Science and Innovations of Vitamin E,” (August 2012, p. 52), and found some discrepancies in the information prepared by Drs. Passwater and Tan. Specifically, the following appeared:

When hearing about proteins and amino acids, many of us have to think back to our middle school science classes. A swarm of polypeptides diagrams dance in our heads, and their meanings begin to escape us. As adults, it’s definitely worth revisiting the basics to see how these proteins fit into our lifestyles and how they can improve our bodies.