The Complete Idiot's Guide Quinoa Cookbook ($18.95, 322 pp) is cookbook that explains the history, benefits and uses of the popular seed quinoa.  Author Susan Irby, “The Bikini Chef”, is known for her show Bikini Lifestyle.  In this book readers will find useful background and nutrition information about quinoa, as well as “Good-for-You Breakfasts”, “Really Tasty Lunches”, “Easy Snacks and Appetizers”, “Delicious Dinners” and more.  She also includes little “extras” throughout the book, with tips and information found in the sidebars.

 


The Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine ($29.99, 1219 pp), by Michael T. Murray, N.D., and Joseph Pizzorno, N.D., is a guide for the public on the use of natural medicine.  This book uses an evidence-based approach to supply scientific information about how natural medicine can help with the maintenance of health and the treatment of disease.

The Ultimate Allergy-Free Snack Cookbook ($15.95, 131 pp) is a kid-friendly recipe book for those with allergies. Authors Judi and Shari Zucker provide allergy-free recipes that are nutritious and kid-approved. The recipes are free of the eight most common allergens, eggs, cow’s milk, soy, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, fish and shellfish. This book also contains helpful information for parents about food allergies and intolerances and how to recognize possible allergens on food labels.

Food in Jars: Preserving in Small Batches Year-Round ($23.00, 237 pp) is a how-to guide for canning and preserving food. Author Marisa McClellan digs back to her roots when her mother first taught her how to can foods growing up in California and Oregon. McClellan says that canning not only delivers great flavors, but also joy and satisfaction throughout the year. In her book, one can read about the equipment and tools needed for canning, and the steps taken in preserving food ranging from jams to pickles and nut butters.

 

Clean Food A Seasonal Guide to Eating Close to the Source ($30.00, 355 pp), by Terry Walters, cookbook author and clean food advocate, is a revised cookbook containing new “clean” recipes with gluten-free varieties. She focuses on using foods such as whole grains, vegetables, legumes, soy, nuts, seeds and fruits, and avoids foods that are processed and stripped of their natural nutrition. Walters also guides readers as to which items are available each season, and the basic techniques needed to prepare these foods deliciously.

 

Eat Naked ($16.95, 193 pp), by Margaret Floyd, touts the importance of organic food in a world overrun by over-processed, unnatural junk foods. Floyd, a nutritional therapy practitioner and certified healing foods specialist, shares her expertise on preparing foods while keeping all of the nutrients and flavor without additives. Included are 40 recipes to encourage the reader to get actively involved in cooking with organics and to help discover the health and positive waistline effects of eating “naked.”

The Kardea Gourmet ($24.95, 232 pp), by Richard Collins, M.D. and Robert Leighton with Susan Bucklet, R.D., explores the Mediterranean diet, a heart-healthy “eating solution” that remedies common concerns such as elevated cholesterol, blood pressure and weight gain with various eating strategies and cooking techniques. The book includes recipes and explores themes including weight management, nutritional supplements and balancing the love of junky eating with heart-healthy eating.

 

Babycakes Covers the Classics ($25.00 143 pp), by Erin McKenna, is a recipe book filled with healthful desserts that are vegan and gluten-, wheat-, soy-, casein-, egg-, and refined sugar-free. Some recipes include cakes, cookies, breakfast items, ice cream creations, sweet snacks and donuts. In the very first pages, McKenna, the chef and owner of BabyCakes NYC, introduces readers to vegan cooking with a Q&A, and additionally starts off each section with her own personal statement to ensure a smooth and enjoyable baking experience.

 

Locavore Adventures ($22.95, 240 pp), by Jim Weaver, is part recipe book, part memoir. It recounts the story of Weaver's time as a restaurant owner angered with the middleman's negative interference with the quality of his produce orders. Weaver soon discovered the Slow Food Movement, which promises "to preserve and protect local foods and local food traditions" as part of its message. The book chronicles his journey in the movement, and his efforts to build a strong, locally-grown food culture.