Burlington, VT— As expected, Vermont’s passage of a law requiring genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food to be labeled has been followed by a lawsuit. The Grocery Manufacturer’s Association (GMA), the Snack Food Association, the International Dairy Foods Association and the National Association of Manufacturers have collectively sued the state in federal court, alleging that the new law is unconstitutional.

If you look down the tea aisle of any grocery store, you’re likely to find an array of teas offering remedies for everything from congestion to indigestion. Many of us may have heard of medicinal beverages such as herbal teas, and as shoppers increasingly use them for wellness, it would appear there is some truth to these health claims. The question is, how much truth?

Valensa International will offer ZanthinNEX Astaxanthin in late 2014. ZanthinNEX is produced through a proprietary process using natural enzymatic conversions that delivers a safe finished product that is “nature equivalent” to conventional Astaxanthin produced via extraction from Haematococcus pluvialis.

PLT Health Solutions, Inc. and Oakshire Naturals, LP launched Earthlight Whole Food Vitamin D. The non-GMO natural mushroom powder ingredient delivers 40,000 IUs of Vitamin D per gram and is suitable for food, drinks and supplements. “Good,” “Excellent” and “High Potency” label claims are possible with 10 mg of the ingredient.

Venetron (Apocynum venetum L) from Maypro Industries supports those with occasional mood challenges. Says the company, “fast-acting Venetron offers a better safety and efficacy profile than St. John’s wort and has mood-supportive, calmness restoring and anxiolytic effects.”