The interests of young adults are more in tune with athletic performance than with preventing the diseases of aging. John J. Cannell, M.D., is reaching out to the young adult audience to help them be healthier for life, by teaching them how to become faster, quicker and stronger as athletes. However, we all can learn how to be healthier from his teachings. Dr. Cannell is a physician, scientist, researcher, teacher and perhaps most importantly, a health activist.

 

Lysaker, NorwayResearchers from Maastricht University in the Netherlands have released some preliminary results from a recent trial on a branded natural vitamin K2 ingredient (MenaQ7 from NattoPharma, based here).

Rockville, MD—The U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP) has announced some additions to the latest version of its Food Chemicals Codex (FCC).

News and notes from industry suppliers.

The teen years are the most challenging for many, particularly those who wake up to numerous skin problems including acne, sensitivities, oiliness and dryness. While many mainstream products are available, unfortunately for many, they still leave these skincare issues as an endless saga. While commercial products may cause irritation, itching, peeling or redness of skin, some natural solutions may be more effective and gentler on your teenaged customers’ skin.

New York, NY—Shoppers may not consider natural health and beauty care (HBC) products discretionary purchases; rather, they’re essential. According to market research firm Packaged Facts, sales in the natural HBC market hit $8.5 billion in 2011. This marks a double-digit growth (11%) since 2005.

The bone and joint health arena is ripe for drawing analogies. For example: it’s not about which tools are in the toolkit, but how you use them. Or: You need a whole orchestra to create a symphony. Further relevance can be found in the idiom: “The early bird gets the worm.” In this context, the prevention-minded supplement-taker gets healthy bones for a lifetime, or can keep the worst of arthritis symptoms from setting in, as the case may be.

While some of us may have a sweet tooth, the cells in our bodies definitely do not. Our cells naturally use a certain amount of glucose for fuel, but they’re not so keen on sweet-stuff overload. Consistently high levels of sugar in our bloodstreams make it tough for pancreatic cells to produce enough insulin. In response, the organ overcompensates by creating too much insulin and eventually becomes damaged (1). As blood sugar levels become consistently high, type-2 diabetes may develop.

Who would have thought one of the hottest foods could also be the most soothing? Capsaicin, the compound in hot peppers that gives them their kick and pepper spray its burn, has become increasingly used in pain-support aids and weight-management supplements.