University Park, PA—The fruit of an avocado may be green, but its seed may be helpful as a totally different natural coloring agent.

Hoboken, NJ—Nearly every student has dreamed of taking a pill that would help him or her get through exams a little easier. While there’s no substitute for hitting the books, a study has found a link between taking a branded supplement ingredient (Pycnogenol, distributed by Horphag Research) and improved test scores. Cognitive enhancers, says the research team, could benefit numerous individuals from the elderly to military personnel.

Carthage, MO—Much research points to the benefits of natural eggshell membrane (NEM from ESM Technologies) for joint health. Now, the Journal of Medicinal Food has published the results of an in vitro study on a mechanism of action for why.

Norway—Those living with ulcerative colitis (i.e., inflammation and sores in the gastrointestinal tract) often have no other choice but to take “hard-core” medications to control their condition like steroids, immunosuppressants and even chemotherapeutics. Many would love a more natural way to control the inflammation. A small animal study conducted by researchers from the University of Bergen, Norway, may offer a new prospect for this purpose.

Hoboken, NJ—Nearly every student has dreamed of taking a pill that would help him or her get through exams a little easier. While there’s no substitute for hitting the books, a study has found a link between taking a branded supplement ingredient (Pycnogenol, distributed by Horphag Research) and improved test scores. Cognitive enhancers, says the research team, could benefit numerous individuals from the elderly to military personnel.

Carthage, MO—Much research points to the benefits of natural eggshell membrane (NEM from ESM Technologies) for joint health. Now, the Journal of Medicinal Food has published the results of an in vitro study on a mechanism of action for why.

Norway—Those living with ulcerative colitis (i.e., inflammation and sores in the gastrointestinal tract) often have no other choice but to take “hard-core” medications to control their condition like steroids, immunosuppressants and even chemotherapeutics. Many would love a more natural way to control the inflammation. A small animal study conducted by researchers from the University of Bergen, Norway, may offer a new prospect for this purpose.

“Dark chocolate is good for your heart! It’s good for your brain! It energizes you!” Too often we hear about the health benefits of dark chocolate without much explanation of why it is good. These reports are not just a way to make us feel better about the sweets we ingest. So, what is it about dark chocolate that has nutrition enthusiasts so excited? It turns out it is not the sugary milk chocolate bar we can thank; it’s cocoa.

Last month, we discussed with Dr. Robert Smith how the media distorted a questionable observational study with multivitamins. Just as scientists were setting the record straight about that study, a vitamin E study captured headlines. Fortunately, Andrew W. Saul, Ph.D., quickly distributed accurate information through the Orthomolecular Medicine News Service (OMNS). Dr. Saul was kind enough to further discuss vitamin E and the recent report with us.